DNF Review: The Tenth Girl by Sara Faring

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★½

Imprint | 2019

DNF’d @ 53%


You know me – I generally don’t quit on books. I’m almost physically incapable of putting down a book if it means I will never know how the story unfolds. Even if I don’t necessarily like the story. It’s a neurotic trait that probably has something to do with the part of my personality that likes to know fucking everything, even the shit that doesn’t involve me.

Like, I don’t want to be involved in drama, but do I want to know about it? You bet you’re fucking ass. Tell me word-for-word what was said.

But, it turns out if the story is boring as all fucking hell, I have no issue putting it away and leaving it behind forever.

That’s the case with The Tenth Girl.

I am sorry, but this was possibly the most boring book I’ve ever read??? I’m struggling to think of something that has made my eyelids this goddamn heavy. All I can come up with is a curriculum book in tenth grade English class. I had my friend explain the book to me and I bullshit that essay like I do these reviews.

feeling myself hair flip GIF

Billed as a Gothic-horror set in an isolated finishing school, I was 100% all in when I picked up The Tenth Girl. My body was READY to be thrilled, scared and enthralled. However, none of those things happened and my body just got really sleepy.

In Southern America, a boarding school sits on land that will curse anyone who settles there, or so the rumour goes. But let’s be real, that land is out to get a MF’er. So of course, someone totally set up shop. And maybe they have a point. Maybe cursed land fucking with you is the best way to teach teenagers.

Mavi arrives at the school as a new teacher. She’s escaped the military regime in Buenos Aires that killed her mother and is looking for a new life. Almost immediately, things get a bit spooky, and Mavi is warned not to roam the building at night… but of course, she doesn’t listen.

Unfortunately, nothing interesting happened when Mavi broke the rules, even though as a reader you’re clearly expecting some creepy shit to go down. The atmosphere might have been dark and trying to build some sinister feels, but that will only take me so far when there are no creepy events. The setting can only do so much when the plot is stagnant.

Perhaps further into the book, the pacing of the plot might have picked up and become a more genuine horror story, but when I’ve made it to the 50% mark and shit is still moving at a snail’s pace, my inclination to stick it out evaporates. And considering this was 450 pages… yeah there was no way I could give up any more of my precious reading time.

By the time the sweet ghostie-kid showed up like fucking Casper, I was done.

Over It Wow GIF by The Comeback HBO

🔪🔪🔪


Simmering in Patagonian myth, The Tenth Girl is a gothic psychological thriller with a haunting twist.

At the very southern tip of South America looms an isolated finishing school. Legend has it that the land will curse those who settle there. But for Mavi—a bold Buenos Aires native fleeing the military regime that took her mother—it offers an escape to a new life as a young teacher to Argentina’s elite girls.

Mavi tries to embrace the strangeness of the imposing house—despite warnings not to roam at night, threats from an enigmatic young man, and rumors of mysterious Others. But one of Mavi’s ten students is missing, and when students and teachers alike begin to behave as if possessed, the forces haunting this unholy cliff will no longer be ignored.

One of these spirits holds a secret that could unravel Mavi’s existence. In order to survive she must solve a cosmic mystery—and then fight for her life. 

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