Review: There’s a Giant Trapdoor Spider Under Your Bed (Dark Corners Collection) by Edgar Cantero

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★★★★

Amazon Original Stories | 2018

Opening Hook: There’s always something under the bed.

Main Monster: Maybe it’s Pennywise in that spider body.

Plot Twisty-ness: Schrodinger’s monsters.


While I didn’t really LOVE Meddling Kids by Cantero the way I wanted to, I can tell that given the right circumstances, I could really be a fan of his, because I do enjoy his writing style.

He writes stories with a whimsical combination of goofy and horror that reminds me of why I love this genre – there is so much room to play. And Cantero always seems to take full advantage of that space, even if I haven’t been bowled over by a full-length novel yet. I know it’s going to happen. I JUST KNOW IT.

There is a feeling of nostalgia to his writing that makes me feel a little less cynical and dead inside. He brings back those memories of when I was as a kid and everything was scary and an adventure was just a thought away; where you could make something up and be totally convinced of it just by way of imagination.

When I was a single-digit tot, I used to believe vampires were out to get me, but if I kept my blanket up under my chin tight enough, I was safe.

I don’t have the kind of imagination anymore, and Cantero makes me wistful for that time, because now I’m old and grumpy, and could tear down all the ways believing that neck protection from a blanket was goddamn ridiculous in 0.2 seconds.

difficult people eating GIF by HULU

Judging by the reviews of this book, it seems a lot of us have really forgotten what it was like to play as kids, to totally believe there was a vampire hiding in your closet just because you had the thought that it was real.

In a very short, but completely enthralling, 24 pages, Cantero took me back to those days of childhood sleepovers where everything and anything was real as long as you and your friends believed it was.

One boy says, “there’s a giant trapdoor spider hiding under your bed. It’s a fact now.

In that one moment, two boys in a bunk bed are thrust into a game of surviving the night, making up the rules as they go along. When the power goes out, the shadows become anti-matter. If you look in the mirror, your reflection escapes and tries to kill you.

This was a totally off-the-wall, nostalgic little story that made my heart happy… and that’s something that I usually require drugs and alcohol to feel.

KIDDING!!! I’m not on some downward spiral. Please, guys.

It’s just the drugs I need. I can give up alcohol no problem.

depressed the simpsons GIF

Was this scary? No, but it reminded me of what being a kid who was scared of monsters in the dark felt like, you know, before life got all messy and depressing because babies are in cages and the world is simultaneously on fire and melting, and these bills don’t pay their motherfucking selves!

This was fun and goofy and kind of creepy, and leaves you with the question: were those real or just the kids’ imaginations? For me, it’s like Schrodinger’s cat. It’s real until the lights come on.

🔪🔪🔪


The thrill of a sleepover becomes sheer terror as kids voice their greatest fears into existence in this cheeky, vividly cinematic tale by New York Times bestselling author Edgar Cantero. Lights out.

It’s bad enough that its venom-dripping chelicerae can slice through flesh like warm butter. Worse? It’s right there under the bunk. It’s a fact now. To make it through the night, the children must obey the rules: don’t get out of bed, stay out of the shadows, and don’t wake the beast. But as the threats multiply, so do the rules of survival. And with the safety of dawn still hours away, the fun is just beginning.

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